King George V Dock

King George V Dock was the newest of the 'Royal' group, opened in 1921 by the Port of London Authority. Originally two new docks had been proposed - one to the north and one to the south of the Royal Albert Dock. However, the First World War delayed construction and eventually only the southern dock was constructed. The KGV covers an area of 64 acres; has an authorised impounded water depth of 2ft 6in above Thames High Water and 35ft 6in below T.H.W. The entrance lock is 800 feet long, 100 feet wide and 45 feet deep below T.H.W. (There is a short film on this website of R.M.S Mauretania entering the lock and passing into the dock). Woolwich Manor Way road was carried over the lock by a bascule bridge that could carry vehicles with an axle load of 16 tons. (When raised to allow passage of vessels in and out of the dock, it held up traffic for some time, giving rise to the local expression "I caught a bridger" as a reason for delay. There is a short channel connecting KGV  to the Royal Albert Dock which is 100 feet wide. There was a dry dock at the western end that was 750 ft long, 100 ft wide and with a depth of 35ft 6in (to the sill) below T.H.W. Originally the dock was flanked by Shed Nos. 2 to 14. These were demolished when the docks closed and this area is now the runway of London City Airport.


Photo: Newham Heritage & Archives


 

King George V Dock